Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions
  • General

    • General FAQs

      • Does my Billy Goat warranty extend to my engine?

        No, the engine manufacturer is responsible for your engine warranty.

      • Where is the Model/Serial tag on my Billy Goat?

         

        The location of this tag varies per model. Following is a tag locator guide.

        VACUUMS

        1. KV model series- Back of housing just left of where the bag attaches.
        2. MV model series- Left side on height adjust plate.
        3. BG model series- Left side of frame next to engine.
        4. VQ model series-Back left side of impeller housing

        MOWERS

        1. FM Finish Mower- On right side of engine base behind right rear tire.
        2. HW High Weed mower- On left side of engine base just inside left drive wheel.
        3. BC Outback Brushcutter- On the back of engine base lower right corner.
        4. HP finish mower- On right side of engine base behind right rear tire.

        RENOVATION

        1. AE Aerator- Back left side of frame.
        2. PR/CR Power Rakes- Back of frame right side.
        3. SC Sod Cutter- Left side by engine.
        4. OSSP- Back left side of frame.

        BLOWERS

        1. F9, 13 & 18 right side of engine base.
        2. F6 model-Right side of engine base.
        3. FZ Back right side housing.

        TRUCK LOADERS

        1. TR/HTR model series-Just right of the engine.
        2. QL model series-Front of engine base.
        3. DL 12, 13, 18 from back of machine right side of engine base.
        4. DL25 back side of housing left of engine.

        NOTE: Left and right are determined from operator’s position.

         

      • Why won’t other equipment cut it?

        While rotary mowers, sickle bar mowers, or hand-held weed cutters are small enough to work around obstacles, none will do the work (with the ease) of the Outback Brushcutter.

        Not only do you have to carry hand-held brushcutters, they only cut debris once, meaning you also have to clean up after them.

        Rotary mowers can mulch debris, but because they have low, enclosed housings, will choke and stall on anything more demanding than a manicured lawn.

        Sickle bar mowers are made for heavy weeds, however, they only cut debris once, leaving ground clutter to clean up. Additionally, the side-to-side motion of the sickle bar creates a violent, tiresome vibration on the operator.

        Only the Outback Brushcutter is small enough to work around obstacles, is self-propelled and specifically designed to cut, chop and reduce heavy vegetation.

      • Who do I contact if I have warranty issues or questions about my engine?

        Contact your local servicing engine dealer for assistance. Have your engine model number available when you contact the dealer. If you can’t locate a dealer in your area, contact the manufacturer’s at the number or website links below.

        Briggs and Stratton
        800-444-7774
        http://www.briggsandstratton.com 

        American Honda
        770-497-6400
        http://www.engines.honda.com 

        Kohler
        800-544-2444
        http://www.kohlerengines.com 

        Robin America Inc.
        800-277-6246
        http://www.robinamerica.com 

        Kawasaki
        616-949-6500
        http://www.kawpower.com 

        LCT
        877-274-2214
        http://www.lctusa.com 

         

      • How should I clean my equipment?

        Power washing is the easiest way to clean your professional lawn equipment. Please be careful, as some components can be damaged during power washing. Please follow these guidelines:

        Transmissions, transaxles and differentials contain grease and the seals are not watertight. Water under pressure will penetrate the case seams allowing water into the internal workings and possibly causing premature failure. Do not direct the spray directly towards the transmission, transaxle or differential of your outdoor lawn equipment.

        Bearings and bushings should not be sprayed directly with water. If they are accidentally sprayed, make sure they are greased or re-lubricated to prevent seizing or premature failure.

        Avoid water contacting the clutch-brake of your outdoor lawn equipment if at all possible. Water getting inside of the clutch brake will cause it to rust, which will cause increased friction and heat, resulting in reduced life of the clutch.

        If lubricant is washed off of the drive chains, they must be re-lubed before using. Running chains dry or without lubrication will cause premature failure of the chain and the drive sprockets.

        Engines: While engines for the most part are sealed, there are certain components that should not be sprayed directly with a power washer. Keep water away from the air cleaner, muffler, recoil start, fuel tank cap area and electrical components. Never wash an engine when hot, the sudden temperature change could be damaging to the engine block, exhaust and electrical components.

    • Mowing Line Product FAQs

      • How does the Outback® Brushcutter work?

        As the Outback® moves forward, vegetation is bent over at the front of the mowing deck. This allows the cutting blade to cut the vegetation at its base. Cut debris is then fed into the deck where it is chopped into smaller pieces before rolling out the back of the deck. It is a very safe, effective design.

      • What is the maximum slope on which I can operate my brush cutter?

        Never mow on a slope greater than 15 degrees. Always mow across the face of slopes, never up and down or diagonally. Do not attempt sudden starts or stops when mowing or on a slope. Avoid sudden turns and use extreme caution when changing directions on a slope.

         

        Test changes.

      • What will the Outback® Brushcutter cut down?

        The Outback brushcutters are designed to cut down tall weeds and vegetation as high as eight feet.

      • Where can I find Outback Brushcutters?

        Unlike mail-order equipment, the Outback Brushcutter is fully assembled and fully supported by our network of authorized service dealers, making sales, service and maintenance simple.

        Please refer to our Dealer Locator to find a dealer near you.

      • Who will benefit from the Outback Brushcutters?

         

        Anyone with wooded, dense or overgrown property will benefit from the Outback Brushcutter. Designed for public works departments and individual property owners alike, the Outback is appropriate for maintaining trails, cutting troublesome brush or periodically clearing meadows.

        The Outback Brushcutter is a commercial grade machine suitable for use by parks and recreation staffs, municipal utilities, tree farmers, orchard owners, rental equipment outlets or anyone that needs to manage troublesome property.

         

      • Why are the Outback Brushcutters safer than other brushcutters?

         

        Designed strictly to clear and maintain non-manicured lawns, the engineers behind the Outback Brushcutter were able to narrowly focus on performance and safety. First, the Outback Brushcutter offers an exclusive blade brake clutch which automatically stops the spinning blade should the operator lose control.

        The Outback Brushcutter also has a low center of gravity, which keeps this Billy Goat stable along slopes while its aggressive tires help maintain traction over all terrains.

        Then, by enclosing all moving parts, the Outback Brushcutter won’t snag debris in the V-belts, pulleys or drive train. Industrial-strength steel deflectors shield against flying debris, while its three forward speeds allow you to match your speed to the job at hand. The Outback Brushcutter also offers a standard reverse gear so you can get out of difficult areas easily.

         

      • What type of battery is required for my electric start brush cutter?

        A CB18, C50, SC50, MCB50 series dry or wet battery with a 17.2 AH rating is required.

      • Should I be concerned if the Outback Brushcutter’s engine suddenly stalls when I’ve run into a hidden stump or rock?

        Absolutely not. First, verify that the obstacle is free of the blade and the blade remains in good working condition. Wheel the unit backward a few feet, and then start the engine. Remember, the Outback® was designed for the unexpected.

      • What will the Outback Brush Cutter cut through?

        Because the Outback Brushcutter has a considerably lower blade tip speed, higher torque and a thicker blade than rotary mowers, it is extremely easy to cut down tall weeds, saplings and small trees. The Billy Goat Outback Brushcutter can manage brush up to 6 ft. and saplings up to 2” in diameter as well as tall, dense vegetation.

    • Debris Line Product FAQs

      • What is the benefit of the swinging deflectors in front of the deck?

        The deflectors are designed to stop or significantly slow down cut debris that tries to fly forward. Billy Goat believes in safety first with its brushcutter.

      • What can I expect from my puncture resistant tires?

        The sealant will last the lifetime of the tires. It will self-seal a puncture up to ¼” diameter and is effective in temperatures from -45° to +200°.

      • How do I determine which KV model is best suited to my needs?

        If you’re going to use the vacuum on steeper inclines or rough terrain, we recommend the self-propelled version. The KV push model is very easy to maneuver and an excellent choice for most homeowners.

      • How long is the hose on the optional On-Board-Hose Kit?

        The hose is 8 feet long. Ideal for cleaning between shrubs, under decks, window wells, utilities and other hard to reach areas.  Most KV vacuums are requested with hose kits because they work so well.

      • Can I increase the length of the KV hose?

        Yes, couplers and additional hose lengths are available but extending the length will reduce suction by as much as 25%. Also, extending the hose will make it more difficult to carry the hose on-board.

      • How much does the KV vacuum shred leaves?

        That varies depending on several factors such as leaf size, moisture content in the leaves, and leaf thickness. Dry ash leaves turn to dust but wet, leathery magnolia leaves may only reduce in a 2:1 ratio. As a general rule, you can expect a 3:1 reduction.

      • Will the KV pick up glass bottles?

        Yes it will—glass bottles up to 12 ounces and cans, too, with no damage to your vacuum.  The KV’s powerful suction makes clean-up a snap for leaves, seeds, mulch, blooms, branches, litter and debris.

      • How long is the hose on the optional On-Board-Hose Kit?

        The hose is 10 feet long and Ideal for cleaning between shrubs, under decks and window wells.   Most MV vacuums are requested with hose kits because they work so well in those hard to reach areas.

      • Can I increase the length of the MV hose?

        Yes, couplers and additional hose lengths are available but extending the length will reduce suction by as much as 25%. Also, extending the hose will make it more difficult to carry the hose on-board.

      • Will the MV pick up acorns and other nuts?

        Not satisfactorily due to the weight and shape of the nuts. It will pick them up fairly well off hard surfaces (sidewalks, driveways etc) and will pick up a greater percentage in grass if they are first loosened with a rake.

      • Why should I buy an MV vacuum instead of a KV vacuum? What is the difference?

        The MV lawn and litter vacuum is ideal for larger properties, commercial lots, leaf clean-up, rental, parks, city streets, school districts or municipal festival clean-up. Whereas the KV is ideal for residential or smaller commercial property maintenance. If you look closely, the housing of the MV is much larger than the KV. The impeller (fan) is six-bladed and larger in diameter. Working in combination, these two parts produce greater suction with less noise at lower engine speed than you’ll find on the KV. The revolutionary bagging system is unique to the MV and another reason many choose the MV vacuum. Both the MV and KV are available with a choice of Honda or Briggs engines and either push or self-propelled.

    • Renovation Line Product FAQs

      • What type of lawn preparation is necessary prior to overseeding?

        First, mow your lawn at the lowest setting on your mower. For best results, power rake to remove thatch from the lawn. If you plan on fertilizing your lawn, do so with a broadcast or drop spreader prior to overseeding. It is important not to water prior to seeding.

      • How can I get the best results from overseeding?

        Always overseed in two passes at ½ the application rate for your selected seed at right angles or in a crisscross pattern. (Drop rate settings are under the seed box lid. A Scotts cross-reference is provided for your benefit.) Water heavily immediately, then lightly for 10 –14 days, keeping soil moist. After germination, water less often to promote root growth.

      • When is the best time to overseed?

        It is best to overseed in the autumn when weed seed has difficulty germinating. Warm days and cool nights with frequent watering will produce the best results. Generally speaking, you want to overseed when no less than three weeks to the date of first freeze occurs.

      • I’m confused, should I power rake or aerate?

        Power raking and aerating are not substitutes for each other though lawns do experience some common benefits. Power raking removes excess organic debris from the lawn. Aerating is meant to reduce soil compaction and improve grass root development.

      • What is thatch?

        Thatch is a layer of semi-decomposed grass and other organic material that accumulates above the soil faster than it can be absorbed. Thatch build-up is a normal occurrence and is not necessarily harmful to the lawn until it gets too thick. Poor mulching mower performance can be a big contributor to thatch build-up.

      • Why should I worry about thatch?

        Thatch forms a barrier between soil and the water, nutrients, and air required for a healthy lawn. It may also serve as a perfect breeding ground for damaging lawn diseases.

      • How can I tell if I need to power rake?

        If thatch is more than ½ thick, you should consider power raking. Take a core sample of grass and soil from your lawn. Measure the organic material sitting on the surface of the soil. It should not exceed ½”. Check several areas of your lawn, as build-up can be irregular.

      • When should I power rake?

        For cool season grasses, power raking is recommended in early fall or spring. Warm season grasses are better power raked in late spring to early summer. Because power raking does damage some healthy grass, it is important to power rake with enough growing season left for your lawn to recover. At least 30 days of growing season should be available following power raking for successful results.

      • How do I get the best results from the power rake?

         

        Soil should be moist, but not too wet. If the soil is too wet the grass could pull away. Best results are achieved when working in two directions. Adjust the depth of the flails under the machine so that they make contact with and remove thatch. The flails should not make contact with the soil. Rake up thatch immediately or use the Billy Goat KV or MV vacuum to make quick work of cleanup.

         

  • Products

    • AE400 Series 19” Mechanical

      • I’m confused, should I power rake or aerate?

        Power raking and aerating are not substitutes for each other though lawns do experience some common benefits. Power raking removes excess organic debris from the lawn. Aerating is meant to reduce soil compaction and improve grass root development.

    • AET Series: 48/72” Towable

      • I’m confused, should I power rake or aerate?

        Power raking and aerating are not substitutes for each other though lawns do experience some common benefits. Power raking removes excess organic debris from the lawn. Aerating is meant to reduce soil compaction and improve grass root development.

    • BC24 Series Outback® Brushcutter

      • What type of battery is required for my electric start brush cutter?

        A CB18, C50, SC50, MCB50 series dry or wet battery with a 17.2 AH rating is required.

      • Who will benefit from the Outback Brushcutters?

         

        Anyone with wooded, dense or overgrown property will benefit from the Outback Brushcutter. Designed for public works departments and individual property owners alike, the Outback is appropriate for maintaining trails, cutting troublesome brush or periodically clearing meadows.

        The Outback Brushcutter is a commercial grade machine suitable for use by parks and recreation staffs, municipal utilities, tree farmers, orchard owners, rental equipment outlets or anyone that needs to manage troublesome property.

         

      • Why won’t other equipment cut it?

        While rotary mowers, sickle bar mowers, or hand-held weed cutters are small enough to work around obstacles, none will do the work (with the ease) of the Outback Brushcutter.

        Not only do you have to carry hand-held brushcutters, they only cut debris once, meaning you also have to clean up after them.

        Rotary mowers can mulch debris, but because they have low, enclosed housings, will choke and stall on anything more demanding than a manicured lawn.

        Sickle bar mowers are made for heavy weeds, however, they only cut debris once, leaving ground clutter to clean up. Additionally, the side-to-side motion of the sickle bar creates a violent, tiresome vibration on the operator.

        Only the Outback Brushcutter is small enough to work around obstacles, is self-propelled and specifically designed to cut, chop and reduce heavy vegetation.

      • How does the Outback® Brushcutter work?

        As the Outback® moves forward, vegetation is bent over at the front of the mowing deck. This allows the cutting blade to cut the vegetation at its base. Cut debris is then fed into the deck where it is chopped into smaller pieces before rolling out the back of the deck. It is a very safe, effective design.

      • Why are the Outback Brushcutters safer than other brushcutters?

         

        Designed strictly to clear and maintain non-manicured lawns, the engineers behind the Outback Brushcutter were able to narrowly focus on performance and safety. First, the Outback Brushcutter offers an exclusive blade brake clutch which automatically stops the spinning blade should the operator lose control.

        The Outback Brushcutter also has a low center of gravity, which keeps this Billy Goat stable along slopes while its aggressive tires help maintain traction over all terrains.

        Then, by enclosing all moving parts, the Outback Brushcutter won’t snag debris in the V-belts, pulleys or drive train. Industrial-strength steel deflectors shield against flying debris, while its three forward speeds allow you to match your speed to the job at hand. The Outback Brushcutter also offers a standard reverse gear so you can get out of difficult areas easily.

         

      • What will the Outback® Brushcutter cut down?

        The Outback brushcutters are designed to cut down tall weeds and vegetation as high as eight feet.

      • What is the benefit of the swinging deflectors in front of the deck?

        The deflectors are designed to stop or significantly slow down cut debris that tries to fly forward. Billy Goat believes in safety first with its brushcutter.

      • What is the maximum slope on which I can operate my brush cutter?

        Never mow on a slope greater than 15 degrees. Always mow across the face of slopes, never up and down or diagonally. Do not attempt sudden starts or stops when mowing or on a slope. Avoid sudden turns and use extreme caution when changing directions on a slope.

         

        Test changes.

      • Where can I find Outback Brushcutters?

        Unlike mail-order equipment, the Outback Brushcutter is fully assembled and fully supported by our network of authorized service dealers, making sales, service and maintenance simple.

        Please refer to our Dealer Locator to find a dealer near you.

      • Should I be concerned if the Outback Brushcutter’s engine suddenly stalls when I’ve run into a hidden stump or rock?

        Absolutely not. First, verify that the obstacle is free of the blade and the blade remains in good working condition. Wheel the unit backward a few feet, and then start the engine. Remember, the Outback® was designed for the unexpected.

      • What will the Outback Brush Cutter cut through?

        Because the Outback Brushcutter has a considerably lower blade tip speed, higher torque and a thicker blade than rotary mowers, it is extremely easy to cut down tall weeds, saplings and small trees. The Billy Goat Outback Brushcutter can manage brush up to 6 ft. and saplings up to 2” in diameter as well as tall, dense vegetation.

    • BC26 Series Outback® Brushcutter

      • What type of battery is required for my electric start brush cutter?

        A CB18, C50, SC50, MCB50 series dry or wet battery with a 17.2 AH rating is required.

      • Who will benefit from the Outback Brushcutters?

         

        Anyone with wooded, dense or overgrown property will benefit from the Outback Brushcutter. Designed for public works departments and individual property owners alike, the Outback is appropriate for maintaining trails, cutting troublesome brush or periodically clearing meadows.

        The Outback Brushcutter is a commercial grade machine suitable for use by parks and recreation staffs, municipal utilities, tree farmers, orchard owners, rental equipment outlets or anyone that needs to manage troublesome property.

         

      • Why won’t other equipment cut it?

        While rotary mowers, sickle bar mowers, or hand-held weed cutters are small enough to work around obstacles, none will do the work (with the ease) of the Outback Brushcutter.

        Not only do you have to carry hand-held brushcutters, they only cut debris once, meaning you also have to clean up after them.

        Rotary mowers can mulch debris, but because they have low, enclosed housings, will choke and stall on anything more demanding than a manicured lawn.

        Sickle bar mowers are made for heavy weeds, however, they only cut debris once, leaving ground clutter to clean up. Additionally, the side-to-side motion of the sickle bar creates a violent, tiresome vibration on the operator.

        Only the Outback Brushcutter is small enough to work around obstacles, is self-propelled and specifically designed to cut, chop and reduce heavy vegetation.

      • How does the Outback® Brushcutter work?

        As the Outback® moves forward, vegetation is bent over at the front of the mowing deck. This allows the cutting blade to cut the vegetation at its base. Cut debris is then fed into the deck where it is chopped into smaller pieces before rolling out the back of the deck. It is a very safe, effective design.

      • Why are the Outback Brushcutters safer than other brushcutters?

         

        Designed strictly to clear and maintain non-manicured lawns, the engineers behind the Outback Brushcutter were able to narrowly focus on performance and safety. First, the Outback Brushcutter offers an exclusive blade brake clutch which automatically stops the spinning blade should the operator lose control.

        The Outback Brushcutter also has a low center of gravity, which keeps this Billy Goat stable along slopes while its aggressive tires help maintain traction over all terrains.

        Then, by enclosing all moving parts, the Outback Brushcutter won’t snag debris in the V-belts, pulleys or drive train. Industrial-strength steel deflectors shield against flying debris, while its three forward speeds allow you to match your speed to the job at hand. The Outback Brushcutter also offers a standard reverse gear so you can get out of difficult areas easily.

         

      • What will the Outback® Brushcutter cut down?

        The Outback brushcutters are designed to cut down tall weeds and vegetation as high as eight feet.

      • What is the benefit of the swinging deflectors in front of the deck?

        The deflectors are designed to stop or significantly slow down cut debris that tries to fly forward. Billy Goat believes in safety first with its brushcutter.

      • What is the maximum slope on which I can operate my brush cutter?

        Never mow on a slope greater than 15 degrees. Always mow across the face of slopes, never up and down or diagonally. Do not attempt sudden starts or stops when mowing or on a slope. Avoid sudden turns and use extreme caution when changing directions on a slope.

         

        Test changes.

      • Where can I find Outback Brushcutters?

        Unlike mail-order equipment, the Outback Brushcutter is fully assembled and fully supported by our network of authorized service dealers, making sales, service and maintenance simple.

        Please refer to our Dealer Locator to find a dealer near you.

      • Should I be concerned if the Outback Brushcutter’s engine suddenly stalls when I’ve run into a hidden stump or rock?

        Absolutely not. First, verify that the obstacle is free of the blade and the blade remains in good working condition. Wheel the unit backward a few feet, and then start the engine. Remember, the Outback® was designed for the unexpected.

      • What will the Outback Brush Cutter cut through?

        Because the Outback Brushcutter has a considerably lower blade tip speed, higher torque and a thicker blade than rotary mowers, it is extremely easy to cut down tall weeds, saplings and small trees. The Billy Goat Outback Brushcutter can manage brush up to 6 ft. and saplings up to 2” in diameter as well as tall, dense vegetation.

    • KV Multi-Surface Residential / Light Commercial

      • How do I determine which KV model is best suited to my needs?

        If you’re going to use the vacuum on steeper inclines or rough terrain, we recommend the self-propelled version. The KV push model is very easy to maneuver and an excellent choice for most homeowners.

      • How long is the hose on the optional On-Board-Hose Kit?

        The hose is 8 feet long. Ideal for cleaning between shrubs, under decks, window wells, utilities and other hard to reach areas.  Most KV vacuums are requested with hose kits because they work so well.

      • Can I increase the length of the KV hose?

        Yes, couplers and additional hose lengths are available but extending the length will reduce suction by as much as 25%. Also, extending the hose will make it more difficult to carry the hose on-board.

      • How much does the KV vacuum shred leaves?

        That varies depending on several factors such as leaf size, moisture content in the leaves, and leaf thickness. Dry ash leaves turn to dust but wet, leathery magnolia leaves may only reduce in a 2:1 ratio. As a general rule, you can expect a 3:1 reduction.

      • Will the KV pick up glass bottles?

        Yes it will—glass bottles up to 12 ounces and cans, too, with no damage to your vacuum.  The KV’s powerful suction makes clean-up a snap for leaves, seeds, mulch, blooms, branches, litter and debris.

      • Why should I buy an MV vacuum instead of a KV vacuum? What is the difference?

        The MV lawn and litter vacuum is ideal for larger properties, commercial lots, leaf clean-up, rental, parks, city streets, school districts or municipal festival clean-up. Whereas the KV is ideal for residential or smaller commercial property maintenance. If you look closely, the housing of the MV is much larger than the KV. The impeller (fan) is six-bladed and larger in diameter. Working in combination, these two parts produce greater suction with less noise at lower engine speed than you’ll find on the KV. The revolutionary bagging system is unique to the MV and another reason many choose the MV vacuum. Both the MV and KV are available with a choice of Honda or Briggs engines and either push or self-propelled.

    • MV Multi-Surface Residential / Commercial

      • How long is the hose on the optional On-Board-Hose Kit?

        The hose is 10 feet long and Ideal for cleaning between shrubs, under decks and window wells.   Most MV vacuums are requested with hose kits because they work so well in those hard to reach areas.

      • Can I increase the length of the MV hose?

        Yes, couplers and additional hose lengths are available but extending the length will reduce suction by as much as 25%. Also, extending the hose will make it more difficult to carry the hose on-board.

      • Will the MV pick up acorns and other nuts?

        Not satisfactorily due to the weight and shape of the nuts. It will pick them up fairly well off hard surfaces (sidewalks, driveways etc) and will pick up a greater percentage in grass if they are first loosened with a rake.

      • Why should I buy an MV vacuum instead of a KV vacuum? What is the difference?

        The MV lawn and litter vacuum is ideal for larger properties, commercial lots, leaf clean-up, rental, parks, city streets, school districts or municipal festival clean-up. Whereas the KV is ideal for residential or smaller commercial property maintenance. If you look closely, the housing of the MV is much larger than the KV. The impeller (fan) is six-bladed and larger in diameter. Working in combination, these two parts produce greater suction with less noise at lower engine speed than you’ll find on the KV. The revolutionary bagging system is unique to the MV and another reason many choose the MV vacuum. Both the MV and KV are available with a choice of Honda or Briggs engines and either push or self-propelled.

    • OS500 Series Push Overseeder

      • What type of lawn preparation is necessary prior to overseeding?

        First, mow your lawn at the lowest setting on your mower. For best results, power rake to remove thatch from the lawn. If you plan on fertilizing your lawn, do so with a broadcast or drop spreader prior to overseeding. It is important not to water prior to seeding.

      • How can I get the best results from overseeding?

        Always overseed in two passes at ½ the application rate for your selected seed at right angles or in a crisscross pattern. (Drop rate settings are under the seed box lid. A Scotts cross-reference is provided for your benefit.) Water heavily immediately, then lightly for 10 –14 days, keeping soil moist. After germination, water less often to promote root growth.

      • When is the best time to overseed?

        It is best to overseed in the autumn when weed seed has difficulty germinating. Warm days and cool nights with frequent watering will produce the best results. Generally speaking, you want to overseed when no less than three weeks to the date of first freeze occurs.

      • I’m confused, should I power rake or aerate?

        Power raking and aerating are not substitutes for each other though lawns do experience some common benefits. Power raking removes excess organic debris from the lawn. Aerating is meant to reduce soil compaction and improve grass root development.

      • What is thatch?

        Thatch is a layer of semi-decomposed grass and other organic material that accumulates above the soil faster than it can be absorbed. Thatch build-up is a normal occurrence and is not necessarily harmful to the lawn until it gets too thick. Poor mulching mower performance can be a big contributor to thatch build-up.

      • Why should I worry about thatch?

        Thatch forms a barrier between soil and the water, nutrients, and air required for a healthy lawn. It may also serve as a perfect breeding ground for damaging lawn diseases.

      • How do I get the best results from the power rake?

         

        Soil should be moist, but not too wet. If the soil is too wet the grass could pull away. Best results are achieved when working in two directions. Adjust the depth of the flails under the machine so that they make contact with and remove thatch. The flails should not make contact with the soil. Rake up thatch immediately or use the Billy Goat KV or MV vacuum to make quick work of cleanup.

         

      • How can I tell if I need to power rake?

        If thatch is more than ½ thick, you should consider power raking. Take a core sample of grass and soil from your lawn. Measure the organic material sitting on the surface of the soil. It should not exceed ½”. Check several areas of your lawn, as build-up can be irregular.

      • When should I power rake?

        For cool season grasses, power raking is recommended in early fall or spring. Warm season grasses are better power raked in late spring to early summer. Because power raking does damage some healthy grass, it is important to power rake with enough growing season left for your lawn to recover. At least 30 days of growing season should be available following power raking for successful results.

    • OS901 Series Hydrostatic SP Overseeder

      • What type of lawn preparation is necessary prior to overseeding?

        First, mow your lawn at the lowest setting on your mower. For best results, power rake to remove thatch from the lawn. If you plan on fertilizing your lawn, do so with a broadcast or drop spreader prior to overseeding. It is important not to water prior to seeding.

      • How can I get the best results from overseeding?

        Always overseed in two passes at ½ the application rate for your selected seed at right angles or in a crisscross pattern. (Drop rate settings are under the seed box lid. A Scotts cross-reference is provided for your benefit.) Water heavily immediately, then lightly for 10 –14 days, keeping soil moist. After germination, water less often to promote root growth.

      • When is the best time to overseed?

        It is best to overseed in the autumn when weed seed has difficulty germinating. Warm days and cool nights with frequent watering will produce the best results. Generally speaking, you want to overseed when no less than three weeks to the date of first freeze occurs.

      • I’m confused, should I power rake or aerate?

        Power raking and aerating are not substitutes for each other though lawns do experience some common benefits. Power raking removes excess organic debris from the lawn. Aerating is meant to reduce soil compaction and improve grass root development.

      • What is thatch?

        Thatch is a layer of semi-decomposed grass and other organic material that accumulates above the soil faster than it can be absorbed. Thatch build-up is a normal occurrence and is not necessarily harmful to the lawn until it gets too thick. Poor mulching mower performance can be a big contributor to thatch build-up.

      • Why should I worry about thatch?

        Thatch forms a barrier between soil and the water, nutrients, and air required for a healthy lawn. It may also serve as a perfect breeding ground for damaging lawn diseases.

      • How do I get the best results from the power rake?

         

        Soil should be moist, but not too wet. If the soil is too wet the grass could pull away. Best results are achieved when working in two directions. Adjust the depth of the flails under the machine so that they make contact with and remove thatch. The flails should not make contact with the soil. Rake up thatch immediately or use the Billy Goat KV or MV vacuum to make quick work of cleanup.

         

      • How can I tell if I need to power rake?

        If thatch is more than ½ thick, you should consider power raking. Take a core sample of grass and soil from your lawn. Measure the organic material sitting on the surface of the soil. It should not exceed ½”. Check several areas of your lawn, as build-up can be irregular.

      • When should I power rake?

        For cool season grasses, power raking is recommended in early fall or spring. Warm season grasses are better power raked in late spring to early summer. Because power raking does damage some healthy grass, it is important to power rake with enough growing season left for your lawn to recover. At least 30 days of growing season should be available following power raking for successful results.

    • Power Rake (Dethatcher)

      • What type of lawn preparation is necessary prior to overseeding?

        First, mow your lawn at the lowest setting on your mower. For best results, power rake to remove thatch from the lawn. If you plan on fertilizing your lawn, do so with a broadcast or drop spreader prior to overseeding. It is important not to water prior to seeding.

      • How can I get the best results from overseeding?

        Always overseed in two passes at ½ the application rate for your selected seed at right angles or in a crisscross pattern. (Drop rate settings are under the seed box lid. A Scotts cross-reference is provided for your benefit.) Water heavily immediately, then lightly for 10 –14 days, keeping soil moist. After germination, water less often to promote root growth.

      • When is the best time to overseed?

        It is best to overseed in the autumn when weed seed has difficulty germinating. Warm days and cool nights with frequent watering will produce the best results. Generally speaking, you want to overseed when no less than three weeks to the date of first freeze occurs.

      • I’m confused, should I power rake or aerate?

        Power raking and aerating are not substitutes for each other though lawns do experience some common benefits. Power raking removes excess organic debris from the lawn. Aerating is meant to reduce soil compaction and improve grass root development.

      • What is thatch?

        Thatch is a layer of semi-decomposed grass and other organic material that accumulates above the soil faster than it can be absorbed. Thatch build-up is a normal occurrence and is not necessarily harmful to the lawn until it gets too thick. Poor mulching mower performance can be a big contributor to thatch build-up.

      • Why should I worry about thatch?

        Thatch forms a barrier between soil and the water, nutrients, and air required for a healthy lawn. It may also serve as a perfect breeding ground for damaging lawn diseases.

      • How can I tell if I need to power rake?

        If thatch is more than ½ thick, you should consider power raking. Take a core sample of grass and soil from your lawn. Measure the organic material sitting on the surface of the soil. It should not exceed ½”. Check several areas of your lawn, as build-up can be irregular.

      • When should I power rake?

        For cool season grasses, power raking is recommended in early fall or spring. Warm season grasses are better power raked in late spring to early summer. Because power raking does damage some healthy grass, it is important to power rake with enough growing season left for your lawn to recover. At least 30 days of growing season should be available following power raking for successful results.

      • How do I get the best results from the power rake?

         

        Soil should be moist, but not too wet. If the soil is too wet the grass could pull away. Best results are achieved when working in two directions. Adjust the depth of the flails under the machine so that they make contact with and remove thatch. The flails should not make contact with the soil. Rake up thatch immediately or use the Billy Goat KV or MV vacuum to make quick work of cleanup.